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Child Support Archives

Helping you navigate child support issues in a divorce

Initiating a divorce can be a difficult step to take. However, when children are involved, parents are often faced with even more challenging issues. The first item up for discussion is often child custody. Yet, even when an agreement is quickly reached with regard to this issue, divorcing parents may still have a number of other complicated matters to address. When a parent requests child support, for example, a heated dispute can ensure.

Are your kids receiving the child support they need?

Divorce can be incredibly hard on kids. When their parents end their marriage, and the family enters into a new normal of custody schedules and visitation, children can become unsettled by the changes in their lives. In Minnesota family law courts can award custodial parents financial support from the noncustodial parents to help provide their children with the goods and services they need to thrive.

Factors that justify a child support modification

When a Minnesota couple shares a child but is no longer together, the custodial parent will often receive child support payments from the other parent. The amount is determined in a variety of ways and is designed to provide for the child's needs. However, there are times when one parent or the other will seek to have the child support order changed. Child support modification can be done, but there must be a good reason or series of reasons for it to take place. Understanding the factors that are taken into account is important before moving forward with the request.

Modifying an existing child support order in Minnesota

Sometimes, months or even years after a child support order is entered into, the financial circumstances of either the paying parent or the receiving parent have changed. For example, a parent may have lost his or her job or, on the other hand, may have seen an increase in his or her income due to a promotion or a new job. The child's financial needs may have changed too as the child grows older. For example, the child may no longer need child care during the day or the child may have incurred additional educational expenses. Whatever the reason, there are times when either the custodial parent or the noncustodial parent in Minnesota may wish to modify their current order for child support.

We could help you receive adequate support for your child

In the event of a divorce, one of the most important aspects that must be considered is the well-being of the couple's children. The financial security of each spouse helps immensely in ensuring their child leads a healthy and successful life. In many cases, one spouse will need the financial assistance of the other in order to provide sufficient care for their children in the form of child support.

How is child support determined in Minnesota?

In Minnesota children have the right to be financially supported by their parents. Child support is a court order of financial support for a child. There are several different ways that child support can be requested, however, it is generally requested by one of the child's parents. Child support is calculated based on child support guidelines and child custody can play a role in child support calculations.

Child support specifics for Twin Cities area divorce cases

Divorce and family law matters can vary greatly depending on the specifics of the Minnesota family in question. At Terzich & Ort LLP we understand how important these specifics are to each family and case in question. For those who are determining child custody arrangements, there is something that should be said for child support obligations and other similar arrangements. Cost of living is a big determinant for deciding child support obligations.

Child support hits unemployed noncustodial parents hard

Like elsewhere in the country, family court judges in Minnesota must make tough decisions when a couple divorces or a nontraditional family separates with one parent taking the couple's children and the other ordered to pay financial support. All of these decisions are made with the best interests of the child in mind. When it comes to setting the amount of child support, factors such as the child's daily living expenses as well as education and medical needs are used to calculate the amount of support to be paid.

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